Jump to content


Rock Shox Dual Air vs Solo Air


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
15 replies to this topic Post Order

#1 Pittstop

Pittstop
  • Members
  • 182 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 11:58

Looking at getting a new front for, and wondering if there are any other reason to go for a fork with dual air over solo air, other than the extra adjustability dual air gives you?

#2 davetapson

davetapson
  • Members
  • 2 332 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 12:38

<minor hijack>
What's the difference between dual air and solo air>
<minor hijack off>

#3 Martin Hattingh

Martin Hattingh
  • Members
  • 2 258 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 12:51

OK, so there's definitely a difference Dave, to start off with.

Modern RS air forks use air as both a positive and negative spring. Positive being the portion which offers resistance against your weight, negative being the portion which offers assistance to get the sliders moving. Essentially, the fork sits in a slightly compressed position at all times, "floating" between the two chambers. The negative chamber helps to reduce stiction and prevents top-out.

With a solo air model, you inflate both chambers at the same time, there is a valve which balances out the pressure automatically.

With a dual air model, you can set the two chambers independently.

Solo is easier to set up (no worries about balancing pressure), but dual air then of course offers more customisation of the initial travel characteristics.

Pittstop, if you're after the ability to set your fork up very sensitively, dual air is the way to go. With my Revelation, I run quite a bit more negative than positive pressure, which I've found makes a huge difference to that initial bit of stroke, it's buttery smooth. At even pressure in comparison (what you'd get with solo air), the fork feels quite clattery.

#4 TNOSE_E

TNOSE_E
  • Members
  • 1 510 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 12:51

Solo Air- An extremely durable spring system. The positive and negative air spring chambers are simultaneously filled to equal air pressures through a single Schrader valve, simplifying suspension setup while retaining the light weight and plush ride quality of Dual Air.

Dual Air-With independently adjustable positive and negative air spring chambers, Dual Air is race or trail ready, highly tunable, and one of the lightest air spring systems on the market.
TheHUBsa.........
The internet's leading authority on all things
Financial, Marital, Political, Medical, Criminal, Travel, Automotive,  Relationships, Shopping, Spelling, Food/Wine,
Traffic, Weather, Astronomy, Hygiene, Media, Soft Porn. And a bit of cycling......

#5 ramsew

ramsew
  • Members
  • 189 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 12:59

View PostMartin Hattingh, on 27 January 2012 - 12:51 , said:

OK, so there's definitely a difference Dave, to start off with.

Modern RS air forks use air as both a positive and negative spring. Positive being the portion which offers resistance against your weight, negative being the portion which offers assistance to get the sliders moving. Essentially, the fork sits in a slightly compressed position at all times, "floating" between the two chambers. The negative chamber helps to reduce stiction and prevents top-out.

With a solo air model, you inflate both chambers at the same time, there is a valve which balances out the pressure automatically.

With a dual air model, you can set the two chambers independently.

Solo is easier to set up (no worries about balancing pressure), but dual air then of course offers more customisation of the initial travel characteristics.

Pittstop, if you're after the ability to set your fork up very sensitively, dual air is the way to go. With my Revelation, I run quite a bit more negative than positive pressure, which I've found makes a huge difference to that initial bit of stroke, it's buttery smooth. At even pressure in comparison (what you'd get with solo air), the fork feels quite clattery.
Hello MH, are you saying if I bias the pressure towards the negative the fork will respond with a plusher ride? Also does plusher equal a greater propensity for softness and pitching?

#6 KnobbyMech

KnobbyMech
  • Members
  • 775 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 01:00

The dual air is worth the bucks. Whatever you do, don't get a Fox. Long story (and they don't have dual air).

#7 covie

covie
  • Members
  • 4 600 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 01:05

weird setup have the negative more than the positve, since the negative is for small bump absorbtion? everyone i know including myself follows the 10psi rule, i.e +@120psi -@110psi and it works really well.

Solo airforks are not as tuneable as dual air. with a solo air both chambers are balanced at for example +120 -120 which is still better than a spring fork in my opinion, since you can set the resistance according to your needs and riding style. A dual airfork however you can change the characteristics to a level thats pitch perfect for youre riding stye.
Im a Alcoholic with a mountain biking problem :\
LOVE THE RIDE

#8 davetapson

davetapson
  • Members
  • 2 332 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 01:14

Thanks MH.

Have a DA Revelation and love it.  I've not tried the greater negative pressure as it seemed a bit counter intuitive to me.  Will give it a go.

#9 Martin Hattingh

Martin Hattingh
  • Members
  • 2 258 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 01:16

View Postramsew, on 27 January 2012 - 12:59 , said:

Hello MH, are you saying if I bias the pressure towards the negative the fork will respond with a plusher ride? Also does plusher equal a greater propensity for softness and pitching?

"Plush" means different things to different people (some may refer to it as that bottomless feeling when you compress your suspension with a big hit), so I don't think I could simply say that it's plusher... :)

Biased towards negative will definitely give you two things though:
  • Increased small-bump sensitivity.
  • Increased traction in situations where there is little weight on the wheel. This is because the fork's neutral position is deeper into its travel, so it actually has some negative travel which helps with keeping the wheel in touch with the ground when you roll *into* holes as opposed to *over* bumps.
More pitching (also called bobbing) is part of this, unfortunately.

Edited by Martin Hattingh, 27 January 2012 - 01:22 .


#10 Martin Hattingh

Martin Hattingh
  • Members
  • 2 258 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 01:21

View Postcovie, on 27 January 2012 - 01:05 , said:

weird setup have the negative more than the positve, since the negative is for small bump absorbtion? everyone i know including myself follows the 10psi rule, i.e +@120psi -@110psi and it works really well.

Yep, it's slightly different to the norm, largely I think due to my riding style. I'm very "animated" when it comes to absorbing bumps (a habit retained from DH racing) and tend to float big hits with my arms/body, so I prefer my forks to be quite soft and biased towards taking care of traction, as opposed to just eliminating big hits. On almost all rides I end up using 90-95% of my suspension travel at some point.

In my opinion, if you're not using your travel, you're wasting it :P

#11 ramsew

ramsew
  • Members
  • 189 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 01:43

View PostMartin Hattingh, on 27 January 2012 - 01:16 , said:

"Plush" means different things to different people (some may refer to it as that bottomless feeling when you compress your suspension with a big hit), so I don't think I could simply say that it's plusher... :)

Biased towards negative will definitely give you two things though:
  • Increased small-bump sensitivity.
  • Increased traction in situations where there is little weight on the wheel. This is because the fork's neutral position is deeper into its travel, so it actually has some negative travel which helps with keeping the wheel in touch with the ground when you roll *into* holes as opposed to *over* bumps.
More pitching (also called bobbing) is part of this, unfortunately.
:thumbup: great that was very clear - thanks

#12 Iwan Kemp

Iwan Kemp
  • Contributors
  • 8 414 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 04:44

With MH on setup. I run 5 - 10% more negative air than positive and it does make the fork soooooooper plush especially small bump.

There's a feeling I get

When I look to the West
And my spirit is crying for leaving


#13 Pain or shine

Pain or shine
  • Members
  • 4 251 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 08:27

View PostMH for short, on 27 January 2012 - 01:21 , said:



Yep, it's slightly different to the norm, largely I think due to my riding style. I'm very "animated" when it comes to absorbing bumps (a habit retained from DH racing) and tend to float big hits with my arms/body, so I prefer my forks to be quite soft and biased towards taking care of traction, as opposed to just eliminating big hits. On almost all rides I end up using 90-95% of my suspension travel at some point.

In my opinion, if you're not using your travel, you're wasting it :P

I'm with you on this.. I run my spring quite soft too and use every bit of my travel. I have a high/low speed compression setting so can fine tune sensitivity as needed. I love my FOX. :)

#14 HaydenE

HaydenE
  • Members
  • 72 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 09:19

Sorry my knowledge is limited, but from what I hear it seems that Fox is perhaps not the best fork to go with now? I have had a RS Recon on my kona (solo air), and then a RS revelation on my Yeti (dual air), and on my Santa Cruz Blur XC I'm running a Fox RLC FIT, so am finding this interesting, as I have found all the forks very good with little to choose from..
Loud hubs saves lives!

#15 Pittstop

Pittstop
  • Members
  • 182 posts

Posted 27 January 2012 - 09:37

Thanks. Now to see how available I can get my hands on a revelation with 20mm axle. Or go with one of the 2012 Sektors

Edited by Pittstop, 30 January 2012 - 05:42 .


#16 ramsew

ramsew
  • Members
  • 189 posts

Posted 29 January 2012 - 09:49

View PostHaydenE, on 27 January 2012 - 09:19 , said:

Sorry my knowledge is limited, but from what I hear it seems that Fox is perhaps not the best fork to go with now? I have had a RS Recon on my kona (solo air), and then a RS revelation on my Yeti (dual air), and on my Santa Cruz Blur XC I'm running a Fox RLC FIT, so am finding this interesting, as I have found all the forks very good with little to choose from..
http://www.bikeradar...-fit-15qr-34973  RLC FIT is an excellent fork, my LBS tuned me how FOX had (but no longer have) seal issues - however I've never had any issues with FOX

Edited by ramsew, 29 January 2012 - 09:59 .